This is a travel video of a Vietnamese Water Puppet Show that took place in Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), Vietnam. : Water puppetry (Vietnamese: Múa rối nước, lit. “puppets that dance on water”) is a tradition that dates back as far as the 11th century CE when it originated in the villages of the Red River Delta area of northern Vietnam. Today’s Vietnamese water puppetry is a unique variation on the ancient Asian puppet tradition.

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Đây là một đoạn video du lịch của một nước Nhà hát múa rối Việt đã diễn ra tại Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh (Sài Gòn), Việt Nam. Múa rối nước (Việt Nam:. Mua roi nuoc, ánh sáng “con rối nhảy múa trên mặt nước”) là một truyền thống mà ngày trở lại như xa như thế kỷ 11 khi nó có nguồn gốc trong các làng của khu vực đồng bằng sông Hồng ở miền Bắc Việt Nam. Múa rối nước Việt Nam ngày nay là một biến thể duy nhất về truyền thống múa rối cổ đại châu Á.

The puppets are made out of wood and then lacquered. The shows are performed in a waist-deep pool. A large rod supports the puppet under the water and is used by the puppeteers, who are normally hidden behind a screen, to control them. Thus the puppets appear to be moving over the water. When the rice fields would flood, the villagers would entertain each other using this form of puppet play.

Modern water puppetry is performed in a pool of water 4 meters square with the water surface being the stage. Performance today occurs on one of three venues—on traditional ponds in villages where a staging area has been set up, on portable tanks built for traveling performers, or in a specialized building where a pool stage has been constructed[4].
Up to 8 puppeteers stand behind a split-bamboo screen, decorated to resemble a temple facade, and control the puppets using long bamboo rods and string mechanism hidden beneath the water surface. The puppets are carved out of wood and often weigh up to 15 kg.
A traditional Vietnamese orchestra provides background music accompaniment. The instrumentation includes vocals, drums, wooden bells, cymbals, horns, Đàn bầu (monochord), gongs, and bamboo flutes. The bamboo flute’s clear, simple notes may accompany royalty while the drums and cymbals may loudly announce a fire-breathing dragon’s entrance.[5]
Singers of chèo (a form of opera originating in north Vietnam) sing songs which tell the story being acted out by the puppets. The musicians and the puppets interact during performance; the musicians may yell a word of warning to a puppet in danger or a word of encouragement to a puppet in need.
The puppets enter from either side of the stage, or emerge from the murky depths of the water.
Spotlights and colorful flags adorn the stage and create a festive atmosphere.

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10 Comments

pho

June 27, 2020

help

Reply

Dạo bộ đây đó

June 27, 2020

Yeah

Reply

Unbecoming Me

June 27, 2020

Ah, I remember this, when I was younger I use to go watch this a lot, thank so much for filming this. This is the part of my childhood that I love, it make me miss Vietnam so much. Thank you for this!

Reply

Fat Hamster

June 27, 2020

im vietnameese aswell!saigon sounds like sigh-gong and ho chi minh city sounds like ho=chee-min-city 😀

Reply

Vy Nguyễn Phan An

June 27, 2020

Wow, looks fascinating 😮 Maybe I should visit puppet theaters more frequently
Thanks for the video Sam & Audrey, it was awesome. <3

Reply

Nomadic Samuel - Travel Channel

June 27, 2020

Thank you! Thanks for watching 🙂

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Nomadic Samuel - Travel Channel

June 27, 2020

Thank you! It was fantastic.

Reply

Nomadic Samuel - Travel Channel

June 27, 2020

That's great!

Reply

sofian mohamed

June 27, 2020

Will be the next month…

Reply

Lost & Found Travel

June 27, 2020

Fantastic.

Reply

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